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Surprise Arizona Cardinals On Pace To Break NFL Scoring Record

Cold, Hard Football Facts for Oct 12, 2015



 


Aaron Rodgers of the Packers is widely hailed as the best quarterback in football while Tom Brady and the New England offense are generating national headlines. 

Fans around the country are already anticipating a Patriots-Packers Super Bowl.

But the best team in football right now may not be the 5-0 Packers or the 4-0 Patriots. The best team in football just might be the Arizona Cardinals, who easily dispatched the pathetic Detroit Lions, 42-17, on the road Sunday.

The 4-1 Cardinals quietly lead the NFL in points scored (190), points per game (38.0), point differential (+100) and per-game point differential (+20.0). 

Perhaps most impressively, the Cardinals are on pace to break the NFL scoring record of 606 points set by Peyton Manning and the 2013 Broncos. With 190 points through five games, the Cardinals are projected to score 608 points.

Sure, way too much football left to be played. It's difficult to keep that pace going. But based on what we have at hand – results through Week 5 – that's the pace the Cardinals are on. Arizona has benefited from four non-offensive touchdowns (one kick return and three pick-sixes). But the scoreboard doesn't judge. It counts all points equally.

The all-time per-game scoring record, however, still seems secure. The legendary 1950 Rams scored 466 points in 12 games – an average of 38.8 PPG. Projected over 16 games, the 1950 Rams would have scored 621 points. 

As we noted recently, there was a lot more scoring in the late 1940s and 1950s that most people realize. The 1950 Rams are a perfect example of the fast-paced game in the leather-helmet days. 

 

 


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